EP. 01: THE “T” IN TEAMWORK IS FOR TRUST

Trust among your team is the emotional glue that binds them together; it’s essential to producing true confidence in each other. There are three factors that create trust within a team:

  • Consistency – People will trust you if, time after time, they see you responding in a consistent and reasonable manner. You also need to be readable, in the sense that they need to know where you are coming from in your decisions and responses.
  • Loyalty – Defend members of your team when they’re criticized and then check the facts later in private, always assuming the best until there is concrete evidence to the contrary.
  • Delegation – When you delegate to your team the power to make decisions, you’re essentially telling them: “I trust you!” People trust leaders who trust them.

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Mingo Palacios:

So Tyler, why don’t you take our viewers through what eight points that represent the word teamwork. Tell us what it all is going to like encompass and then why don’t you take us into the first point.

Tyler Hofer:

Okay. Yeah. You said there’s eight points and it’s an acronym that strategically spells out the word…

Mingo Palacios:

Teamwork.

Tyler Hofer:

Teamwork. And as I kick this off, we’re going to be starting with the “T”. My name’s Tyler.

Mingo Palacios:

Seemed appropriate.

Tyler Hofer:

Perfect. So “T” stands for trust. And we’re going to talk a little bit about how trust plays a part as a value in building this team spirit, this team mentality here at Torrey Pines. And so it starts with trust. And I love that we tie a scripture passage into each one of these points and the passage of scripture that ties into this idea of trust comes out of the book of Philippians when Paul is actually writing to Timothy. I believe he’s in prison, but he’s sending Timothy off to the church in Philippi saying, “I’m sending Timothy with my blessing, my trust. I’m sending him off.” And how does he trust Timothy? Like, where does he get this trust? We’re going to talk about that. How did he build that trust? But he trusts him so much that later on in the passage he talks about that Timothy has proven himself, over time, worthy of carrying on the work of the Gospel. So not a small task. Going into who knows what he was going into in the Church of Philippi. But there’s a sense of trust that has developed there between Timothy and between Paul.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. And it’s funny because it is the work of the Gospel, but I think as we observe it localized here contextualized, it could be as a leader, something that you’ve started and the idea of teamwork is that you have to actually literally pass it. So the observation that it’s Paul’s work defined by the Gospel, he’s having to trust somebody else with that work now. Right?

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

And that is kind of the core value that the church and the ministry that we all serve alongside of. It’s not the power work of a few, but it really is intended to be a collective whole that we share. And that’s the value of teamwork. So, what builds trust?

Tyler Hofer:

What builds trust? Well, let’s start with consistency. I think that’s the first thing is spending time together with people, that consistency of having leaders or volunteers show up on a regular basis and getting to know their story because really that’s the only way that you really get to know someone is through consistency. And you know that in any relationship that’s true.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Tyler Hofer:

Take my relationship with my wife.

Mingo Palacios:

Totally.

Tyler Hofer:

Dude, trust, like the cornerstone of what our relationship is built on. And that has only gone up over time as we’ve been consistent with one another doing life together. But I think that that translates over to almost any relationship that you have in life. And that’s including on a volunteer team or a ministry team is just bumping shoulders with one another, working in the trenches together. Even when it’s not glamorous or fun towards that consistency. And so the more consistent someone can be on a team, whether that’s a greeter team, coffee team, wherever their station, that just builds trust over time. And you know that you can rely on people when they show up and they’re ready to roll up their sleeves and get to work.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. It’s trust with your peers, but it’s also a trust with your team leader.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

Right? Carolina, any observation inside of your world? You manage a few great teams. When it comes to trust, how valuable is consistency?

Carolina Corrales:

Oh, it is so valuable. Being consistent is key. If we don’t have somebody that’s, you know, showing up on a regular basis, the team, I mean, you don’t really have a team.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. The team at large suffers.

Carolina Corrales:

Exactly. So I think when I’m somebody that comes in, you know, for the first time and then they continue to see those same faces, that is, I mean, that’s just key.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. That is a really good point.

Carolina Corrales:

Yeah.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

It builds trust worthiness. Consistency actually, it elevates the trustworthiness of the organization. If you think about it, you know, so somebody would say, “Oh, like there’s plenty of people that are going to show up and serve this morning and I’m super tired and Saturday night really wrecked me.” But you fail to realize that by you showing up. I love that you said that, you being a memorable face or being a memorable person inside of the larger equation, it actually elevates the trust worthiness of the church, you know, so good.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. Let’s talk also about another thing that builds trust is standing with someone when they are taking heat.

Mingo Palacios:

Like when somebody fails out?

Tyler Hofer:

Exactly. Yeah. And we were talking earlier that I probably have the most expertise in this area. Being a former youth pastor, notorious for, you know, being the-

Mingo Palacios:

Trying something.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. Yeah. And taking heat, you know, if something goes wrong in the church, blame the student ministry. Right?

Mingo Palacios:

That’s sad.

Tyler Hofer:

And so yeah, if something gets broken, it’s the student ministry’s fault. So I’ve had examples being the youth pastor where I had leaders above me stand beside me and be able to see my heart in the midst of failure and know that my heart is good, even though sometimes my actions could be taken in the wrong way.

Mingo Palacios:

The key is that people don’t scatter when something goes wrong.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. Right. Yeah. And it’s trust. It’s trust. And when you’re consistent and you know someone, you know their heart, you can stand with them in the middle of those failures. And kind of going back to that scripture passage in Philippians where Paul and Timothy were kind of exploring that relationship, that dynamic actually later on, I don’t know if it’s later on, but another passage of scripture in First Corinthians, we see that Paul Sends Timothy off to the church in Corinth to tackle a really tough situation. And if you read that chapter, you know that there’s not a full resolution. And you might even say that Timothy failed on some accounts to bring them out maybe what Paul had hoped for Timothy.

Mingo Palacios:

Execute the mission.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. And yet we see that Paul doesn’t cut Timothy off, cut ties with Timothy. If anything, it builds more trust.

Mingo Palacios:

Reinforces the trust.

Tyler Hofer:

“Gave you a hard task. You did your best. You may have failed in some aspects, but I’m not cutting ties with you.”

Mingo Palacios:

And came back for more learning and said, “I need to be better equipped.”

Tyler Hofer:

Yup. Exactly.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s super good.

Tyler Hofer:

And so where do we get the proof of trust in any relationship in our teams? And I think that that comes through being able to delegate tasks and to be okay knowing that it’s not going to necessarily be the way that you would do it.

Mingo Palacios:

The way you would do it, right? The way you’ve done it.

Tyler Hofer:

Or, yeah. And I have struggled a lot with it. This is an area that God has worked on me hardcore-

Mingo Palacios:

That’s great.

Tyler Hofer:

In this season of life is being a perfectionist and having a way that I like things done. Being ok to delegate and trust the people that are in place and you know, and to trust that they’re going to do a great job. And so-

Mingo Palacios:

I love it. It’s a two way street. Delegation, it both provides an opportunity to be trusted. You think of the value of the person you’re instilling in them the reality that you are being trusted. Right? But then also it’s the ability to prove that you are trustworthy and all of that comes out of delegation. And so if you fail to delegate, you fail to really even kick off the idea of this being a team thing because you’re really just holding it for yourself.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. And that’s failure really. Right? If it’s built upon you, I mean, going back into Paul and Timothy, I feel like we’re talking a lot about this, but it’s just a great picture of trust. And that Paul was preparing Timothy to carry on the work that he had started.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good.

Tyler Hofer:

It didn’t end with Paul. Paul knew that it couldn’t end with him.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Tyler Hofer:

He had to raise up apprentices. And so the question really is who are you apprenticing? Like, who are you bringing up underneath you? Who are you trusting with this work of carrying on the Gospel?

Mingo Palacios:

Who is your apprentice? And if you’re a solo leader, you might be filling a critical role, but you certainly aren’t practicing discipleship.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

And let’s remember that like The Great Commission is to make disciples and a great place to exercise that to practice that is right here in your very own ministry.

Tyler Hofer:

Absolutely. Yup.

Carolina Corrales:

Great example of that. You lead, you oversee so many ministries here on this campus and to know that you can trust every single person that is in charge of each ministry, You’re trusting that we all as a team collectively, you’re delegating us to do what, whatever it is that needs to get done.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good.

Tyler Hofer:

Thank you Carolina. That was so nice.

Mingo Palacios:

She just put a star on your shirt. You’ve got a gold star right there.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. So let’s just do a recap really-

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Tyler Hofer:

Of this “T” of this value of trust is that consistency. That’s how you build it is through consistency. You build trust also through standing with, with people when they’re taking heat, when they may have failed standing beside them. And then really the proof of trust is in delegating tasks and to give responsibility really over to these other leaders and watch them take that responsibility and run with it. So, all right, let’s hand it off to Mingo for our next one.

Mingo Palacios:

I got the next one.

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