EP. 04: THE “M” IN TEAMWORK IS FOR MANAGEMENT OF MISTAKES

The Bible teaches: “Even though a righteous man falls seven times, he rises again.” (Proverbs 24:16, NIV) I love that saying because it points out that even righteous people make mistakes and stumble occasionally. Mistakes are not failures, because you’re never a failure until you give up. Mistakes teach us what doesn’t work. If you’re not making any mistakes, it means you’re playing it safe and not trying anything new. I tell my staff that I want every one of them making at least one new mistake a week – as long as it isn’t the same old one! Mistakes are how we learn and get better.

QUOTABLE QUOTES

DOWNLOAD TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

READ THE TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

So the next value inside of the acronym teamwork is the “M”. And it’s all about how we manage mistakes, right? And so there’s management and mistakes. And then there’s the management of mistakes. I love what scripture says in Proverbs Chapter 24 it says, “For though a righteous man falls seven times, he rises yet again.” So notice the description of the man. It’s a righteous person. It’s not like a conniving person trying to tear something down. It is a well intended person, still can fall and inside of any ministry team inside of any volunteer team, we just have to anticipate mistakes. And there’s one way that you can really capitalize on a mistake when you run into it. And then there’s another way that can really dissolve a team. It can really break down a team and we’re going to articulate it right now. The bottom line is this, that when we run into mistakes, either as leaders or as volunteers, we want to identify it. We want to recognize it as an education, right? It’s a learning moment, not as a failure, right? And I think our internal dialogue would say, “Gosh, I really failed on that one.” Or you know, somebody can point you out and be like that, “You’ve failed there.” Right? But to elevate, to raise the culture and say, “Let’s call it an education. Right? That was a learning opportunity for all of us.” It creates safety inside of a team where we know we’re standing with people despite a misstep to go, “It’s an education, right? We’re going to learn from it. We’re going to come back from it, and we’re going to approach it in a different direction.”

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

Anybody have a personal experience with like how we manage the mistakes we make or the mistakes other people have made?

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. I’ve been on a learning curve here at Torrey Pines. I mean, I’ve been here forever. I’ve seen a lot of change.

Mingo Palacios:

Since the beginning of time. Since the beginning of time.

Tyler Hofer:

I’ve seen a lot of change. Yeah. And just kind of growing into my new role that I’m in now, overseeing adult ministries, coming from youth ministry into adult ministries and being a part of this larger network of churches, I think that there’s been a lot of grace afforded to me. I’ve been called out at times of not thinking large enough, not thinking wide enough.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Tyler Hofer:

The language that we use can sometimes be misconstrued, can be confusing. And so yeah, I think that there’s definitely an education that’s come along with that of just being mindful of the language I use and how I talk and how I-

Mingo Palacios:

Present.

Tyler Hofer:

Yeah. Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

How you build and construct inside the ministry.

Tyler Hofer:

Exactly. I don’t want to get too specific on things, but it’s just an education that’s an ongoing thing. And I’ve learned more in the last year of ministry than I did in the previous seven. And I love how God is stretching me in that area, but I’m also so thankful for the grace that’s been afforded me in the process.

Mingo Palacios:

I love it because your posture alone suggests that somebody is helping you see like every action, no matter, good or bad as an education, right? That you’re not getting like reprimanded for certain things as seen as like a failure. “Oh guys, we failed on this one.” And while certain educations come by way of like the wrong answer versus the right answer, if we can create a culture that says, “It’s an education we’re learning.” Right? The way we internalize things is by it mattering to us. And I think that the culture of a family and unity, it matters for us here. So when we find people that make mistakes in our ministry, not to like go, “Ah, you did it wrong.” Right? Or, “Man, you’ve done it wrong over and over and over again.” But to go like, “How do we see this as an opportunity to learn?” Right? And Carolina, you said something really great about how we address it if they’re in a group setting or an individual setting.

Carolina Corrales:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

You can make or break somebody’s experience,

Carolina Corrales:

We’ve all made a mistake at once point in our life, whether it’s at work, at home, in life. And I think when, you know, in a work setting, if you have a manager that calls you out, publicly or you know, the manner in which they handle that-

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Carolina Corrales:

I think you as a person, like you’re going to remember that.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah.

Carolina Corrales:

And wouldn’t you rather remember the person that really helped you to-

Mingo Palacios:

Did it well.

Carolina Corrales:

Yeah, it did it well and helped you through it and helped you identify what it was that you did and how, you know, how we could fix that.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. That’s good.

Carolina Corrales:

But in a loving way.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. So it’s real simple. It’s not a big, it’s not to be over expounded on, but when you are managing teams, just to recap, when you’re dealing with mistakes or inconsistencies by way of like what we’re asking folks to like sign up for or like dive into, when you chalk it up to an education, you can relieve pressure of somebody feeling like they failed out. Right? We don’t want people to expect that they’ll never make a mistake, but as leaders, we can really manage the quality of that experience by chalking it up to an education than just being like, “Hey, you failed. Let’s try to fail less.”

Carolina Corrales:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

[laughing] What’s next?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *